Trump’s Plan to Defund Planned Parenthood Cheers Pro-Life Advocates

Trump’s Plan to Defund Planned Parenthood Cheers Pro-Life Advocates

Administration prepares to propose Title X funding cuts for abortion providers. Pro-life evangelicals are celebrating another move by the Trump administration to cut federal funding for abortion. According to reports, the White House is expected to announce new regulations prohibiting Planned Parenthood and other entities that make abortion referrals from receiving grant money through Title X, the government’s quarter-billion-dollar family planning program. Already, Title X funds cannot be used for abortion itself. But Planned Parenthood still receives more than $50 million every year to cover birth control and other services for low-income and uninsured patients. Under the new policy, clinics could not accept the money at all if they perform or recommend abortions. Russell Moore, president of the Southern Baptist Convention’s Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, called the...Read more
Dorothy Sayers Did Not Want to Be a Prophet

Dorothy Sayers Did Not Want to Be a Prophet

Nevertheless, the saucy British writer made the pious vociferously angry. Between 1941 and 1944, C. S. Lewis gave a series of BBC radio talks, eventually published as Mere Christianity, that are the stuff of legend. Less well known today is a series of BBC broadcasts during the same era written by Dorothy L. Sayers: a retelling of the gospel message that Lewis himself valued highly. Ironically, numerous evangelicals who relished Lewis’s BBC work as well-seasoned intellectual food wanted to spew Sayers’s broadcasts out of their mouths. While Lewis was lionized, Sayers received an anonymous postcard calling her a “nasty old sour-puss.” Lewis was elevated to the cover of Time, whereas some in England actually accused Sayers of causing the fall of Singapore during World War II. Sayers’s BBC broadcasts, in fact, incited one of the biggest religious controversies in England since Henry VIII...Read more
Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Is Not a Ministry Guide

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Is Not a Ministry Guide

The infamous pyramid was never an accurate description of how people act, let alone a guide to discipleship. You may have been told once or twice: “People can’t hear the gospel if they’re hungry.” I’ve read it dozens of times in statements from pastors in the United States. But where, exactly, does the idea come from? Many pastors depend on Maslow’s hierarchy of needs to decide how churches should minister—even though it’s been debunked. The hierarchy of needs is a theory of human motivation, proposed in 1943 by psychologist Abraham Maslow, that says human beings have layers of needs: physiological, safety, belonging, esteem, and self-actualization, in that order. When people start to feel a certain need—say, the need for satisfaction in their jobs—it is because the lower layers of needs have been satisfied. Maslow put physiological needs at the bottom of his hierarchy, indicating that...Read more
Re-thinking My Savior Complex

Re-thinking My Savior Complex

My hardest lesson as a social worker? God wants me to be close to the brokenhearted as much as he wants me to save them. Twenty-four years old, conscious of my lack of preparedness and certain I would choke on my words, I stood on a dusty country road with a heroin addict whom I had come to know and root for. I was advising him to surrender his parental rights before I asked the judge to terminate them. Caseworker jargon tumbled nervously out of my mouth, but my stilted words did not matter—he knew what I was saying. We had prepared for it. He and I had always called this scenario What Could Go Wrong. By the time his child was brought into foster care, my client had experienced more than 10 years of severe opioid addiction. The reunification prognosis was poor. “There is nothing more terrifying than a sober life,” the man once told me. “I guess I don’t really know what a sober life...Read more
Interview: Will the ‘First Testament’ Grab Your Attention?

Interview: Will the ‘First Testament’ Grab Your Attention?

Scholar John Goldingay wants readers to rediscover the original feel of the Old Testament in his new translation. Many people struggle with Bible reading and engagement in general, but this is particularly true with the first part of the Bible. We know that those who do read tend to spend more time in the New Testament. But there is no good way to understand Jesus without understanding what came before him—the stories, songs, and promises that shaped everything he said and did. Old Testament scholar John Goldingay wants readers to rediscover the original feel of these passages in his new translation, The First Testament. Glenn Paauw, senior director of content at the Institute for Bible Reading, spoke with Goldingay about how certain ways of rendering the Bible can usher us back into the Bible’s own world. First, the inevitable question: Why does the world need another Bible...Read more

Receive Our Newsletter

Sign up to receive latest Christian news and editorial updates from Trumpet Media

You have Successfully Subscribed!